Murder On The Orient Express- Review

Murder on the Orient Express- Review

Title: Murder on the Orient Express- Review
Book: Murder on the Orient Express
Author: Agatha Christie
Publisher: Collins Crime Club
Genre: Crime novel
First Published In: 1934
Pages: 274 (Paperback edition, 2017)
Major Characters: Hercule Poirot, M. Bouc, Dr. Constantine, Mary Debenham, Mrs. Hubbard, Samuel Ratchett, Princess Dragomiroff

Murder on the Orient Express is a classic detective fiction written by Agatha Christie in 1934.  Agatha Christie (15 Sept 1890 – 12 Jan 1976) was an English Detective novelist and playwright who wrote 75 novels (in one life). Her books have been translated into approx 100 languages and sold more than 100 million copies.

She is called “The Queen of Crime” because of writing an unimaginable and incredible 66 detective novels. She is the world’s most famous mystery writer. When the author has such a fantastic personality, you can’t doubt her books.

Murder on the Orient Express is one of her greatest murder mysteries. This book was gifted to me by my friend, and I thank her even today for introducing me to such a marvelous novel. When I read about Agatha Christie, I was overwhelmed by her achievements. It may sound crazy, but I unconsciously treated this book as a sacred text, something which should be worshiped. When I was touching the book, I considered that as my achievement. You would feel the same once you read the book.

The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.
 -Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express

Murder on the Orient Express features the Belgium detective Hercule Poirot. He boards The Orient Express to go London, but the train is stopped mid-way by heavy snow, and at midnight a person is found dead in a compartment with the compartment door locked from the inside. Detective Hercule Poirot must identify the murderer who is considered to be on the train itself. I would really appreciate it if anyone can stop reading the book in the middle. This book automatically creates a flow.

Murder On The Orient Express- Review

When I was reading it, I kept guessing who would be the murderer, and the more I did, the more confused I was. The pieces of evidence were confusing, and the suspects were unsusceptible. I kept thinking about what I read, filling the blanks, and trying to solve the mystery in my own mind.  I was able to guess nothing correctly till the end. And what an ending the story has! It is mind-boggling.  As it happens with great detective novels, the ending is completely unforeseen- nothing is clear until the last chapter, where everything is revealed.

I kept rereading, connecting the dots to digest what has happened. I became a fan of Hercule Poirot, who solves a complex case like this with such confidence. I imagined myself in place of him (because it is free to imagine) and enjoyed this mystery. The book keeps all the promises it makes. No matter why it is one of the most-read detective novels.

But I know human nature, my friend, and I tell you that, suddenly confronted with the possibility of being tried for murder, the most innocent person will lose his head and do the most absurd things.
 -Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express

Since Murder on the Orient Express is written in the 1930s, the language is somewhat old-fashioned, and French phrases are often used. You may need to search those phrases on the internet to understand the meaning. Otherwise, it is effortless to understand. It is a light book with a heavy plot. I am going to read more of Agatha Christie’s books. And I would suggest this book to anyone who wants to read a great mystery novel. My friends, read it, and you won’t regret.

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